Schlagwort-Archive: invasion science

Working in the invertebrate lab

Insects and spiders of Galápagos

Together with my colleagues from the invertebrate lab of the Charles Darwin Research Station I recently finished the identifications of the spider, beetle and bug samples from the Los Gemelos project. We found a number of very interesting endemic species such as the spiders Darwinneon crypticus, Galaporella thaleri or Olios galapagoensis as well as endemic beetles such as Anchonus galapagoensis, Ataenius aequatorialis or Mordellistena galapagoensis. It was a great experience for me to see all this new species – and of course to work with the awesome team. Many thanks! Back in Berlin again, I am going to run the statistical analyses – look out for coming publications. If you are already interested in some basic results from the Los Gemelos project please make a note of the following paper which will published in the Galápagos Report soon:

Restoration of the blackberry-invaded Scalesia forest: impacts on the vegetation, invertebrates and birds (by Jäger H, Cimadom A, Buchholz S, Tebbich S, Rodriguez J, Barrera D, Breuer M, Walentowitz A, Carrión A, Sevilla C & Causton C)

Capturing Darwin Finches in the highlands of Santa Cruz

Bird ringing at Los Gemelos

Together with Arno Cimadom, his team from the University of Vienna and researchers of the Charles Darwin Research Station I spent gorgeous morning hours in the highlands of Santa Cruz. We captured darwin finches (e.g. warbler and tree finches as well as the woodpecker finch) using mist nets and ringed them. The field work was part of the Los Gemelos research project which among others focuses on how control of the invasive blackberry affects darwin finches in the Scalesia forests. I usually work with invertebrates – not only in this project – and thus I was glad to do some ornithological work for a change.

Let’s go to Galápagos!

I am looking forward to spend a glorious time in Galápagos. I am going to participate in a research project for three months …

CDFOver the last 10 years, the Galápagos National Park Directorate has carried out manual and chemical control of the invasive blackberry in the Scalesia forests at Los Gemelos on Santa Cruz. It is possible that this management has changed the structure of the forests which is supposed to affect invertebrates and birds that live there. To analyse effects of the management on plants, invertebrates and birds, a multi-taxon monitoring has been established. My part in this project is to evaluate the efficacy of the blackberry control measures and the impacts on non-target invertebrate species.

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