Schlagwort-Archive: birds

New paper …

Restauración del bosque de Scalesia invadido por mora: Impactos en la vegetación, los invertebrados y las aves has been published in Informe Galápagos.

Authors Jäger H, S Buchholz, A Cimadom, S Tebbich, J Rodríguez, D Barrera, A Wolentowitz, M Breuer, A Carrión, C Sevilla & C Causton

Birding in Berlin

Urban birds of prey

Several raptor species become more and more urban dwellers and they thrive very well in many different urban habitats now. In Berlin, four species are very common – even in heavily urbanised areas. While the common buzzard (Buteo buteo) mostly inhabits parks and urban woodlands, aeries of the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) and the common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) can be found in higher buildings all over the city. The latter can be regularly seen at the Tempelhofer Feld (see photo) and a good place to observe the peregrine falcon is the Alexanderplatz and the television tower which is used as raised hide, even during the night. kestrel

In the last years, we conducted research on the northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis). Interestingly, this species spreads more and more into the heavily urbanised areas and while it was breeding in urban parks and large gardens at the beginning, aeries can be found in backyards in isolated tree by now. Sometimes northern goshawks are even hunting in busy roads like the Schlesische Straße in Kreuzberg. Watch out for more findings …

Capturing Darwin Finches in the highlands of Santa Cruz

Bird ringing at Los Gemelos

Together with Arno Cimadom, his team from the University of Vienna and researchers of the Charles Darwin Research Station I spent gorgeous morning hours in the highlands of Santa Cruz. We captured darwin finches (e.g. warbler and tree finches as well as the woodpecker finch) using mist nets and ringed them. The field work was part of the Los Gemelos research project which among others focuses on how control of the invasive blackberry affects darwin finches in the Scalesia forests. I usually work with invertebrates – not only in this project – and thus I was glad to do some ornithological work for a change.

New paper on urban biodiversity

Biological richness of a large urban cemetery in Berlin. Results of a multi-taxon approach has been published in the Biodiversity Data Journal.

Abstract
Urban green spaces can harbor a considerable species richness of plants and animals. A few studies on single species groups indicate important habitat functions of cemeteries, but this land use type is clearly understudied compared to parks. Such data are important as they (i) illustrate habitat functions of a specific, but ubiquitous urban land-use type and (ii)
may serve as a basis for management approaches. We sampled different groups of plants and animals in the Weißensee Jewish Cemetery in Berlin (WJC) which is one of the largest Jewish cemeteries in Europe. With a total of 608 species of plants and animals, this first multi-taxon survey revealed a considerable biological richness in the WJC. In all, 363 wild-growing vascular plant, 72 lichen and 26 bryophyte taxa were recorded. The sampling also yielded 34 bird and 5 bat species as well as 39 ground beetle, 5 harvestman and 64 spider species. Some species are new records for Berlin.

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